Extra patrols happening around city’s ‘hot spots’

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – Extra eyes are canvassing the area where an innocent man was gunned down.

Nathan Trapuzzano was shot near 16th and Tibbs Avenue Tuesday morning. He was a newlywed with his first child on the way.

Two districts, southwest and northwest, merged on Wednesday to find information, tips, anything to help solve this crime.

But another branch of IMPD joined in Wednesday in that specific neighborhood, something the city is about to see happen more often.

“First I was scared, I was like should I move, should I stay, but then I was like you know what I’m not going to let anyone move me from my home,” said Tara Johnson.

She’s talking about the heinous crime that happened just around the corner from her home.

Early Tuesday, Nathan Trapuzzano was killed while walking around his own neighborhood.

“We need this protection on this neighborhood because there’s so much crime going on,” she said.

The protection is growing. Looking just off Johnson’s porch, you can see IMPD’s mobile command center. It’s where dozens of officers assembled on Wednesday before casing the area. One of those officers was Chris Meyers.

“I’m assigned traffic branch on motorcycles so normally I’m on a two wheeled motorcycle,” he said.

But Wednesday, he was behind the wheel in a neighborhood he normally doesn’t work in.

Meyers is part of IMPD’s Homeland Security Traffic Branch.

“There’s like five of us out here today,” he said.

Normally he’s working special events at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway or keeping an eye on the north district.

But in order to curb crime, 27 officers like him are being placed in hot spots around town. Wednesday’s assignment was the area where Trapuzzano was killed.

“It’s a pity, it’s a shame. And your heart goes out to the community when this happens,” he said.

He’s focused on your everyday traffic stops, which allows the officers who normally work in the district to focus on solving  Trapuzzano’s murder.

The extra presence is good news for Johnson. She just hopes it makes a difference.

“I saw couple cops and I see the mobile van down there and I feel safe but you know you still kind of nervous because it could happen to you,” she said.

Officers like Meyers don’t often know where they will be assigned until they show up for roll call.

They could be in a neighborhood dealing with a rash of burglaries one day, or patrolling the streets near a crime scene as we saw this afternoon.

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