New Animal Care and Control leader raises concerns

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – The new head of Indianapolis Animal Care and Control is raising widespread worries throughout the animal community.

Spencer Moore took over as the interim head of ACC earlier this week, after the former coordinator resigned. Moore served in the same position during the 1990s. During that time, some people say conditions were awful for the animals. Now, Moore’s opponents are worried he will start making sweeping changes throughout the organization.

Moore denies any plans to make major changes.

“My plan for this shelter is to keep it going exactly as it is, basically. They’re very successful. They know exactly what they’re doing,” said Moore.

Susan Hobbs is Chair of the Indianapolis Animal Care and Control Board. She says he’s already making worrisome changes, like making rescuing animals harder.

Darcie Kurtz with FACE Spay/Neuter Clinic agrees with Hobbs.

“I’m hearing that there is a minimization of the rescue involvement, such that the rescues won’t be able to come to the shelter, as freely and pull animals out of the shelter,” said Kurtz.

Moore says he’s only adding more accountability and communication within ACC. But Hobbs worries the conditions at ACC will relapse back to the conditions of the 1990s, under Moore’s command.

“I feel like he represents the absolute, worst, darkest period in Indianapolis animal welfare,” said Hobbs.

Hobbs believes Moore will revert back to the “catch and kill” mentality of years past. Moore points out that the Board of Safety commended his efforts to reduce euthanization when he first left ACC in 1999.

“Does that sound to you like I’m a person that’s in a hurry to kill or anything with these animals other than get them released alive and find a good home for them to be in?” asked Moore.

Moore said he does not plan on taking the job permanently.

“I’m 70 years old. I’m doing this as a favor to somebody who needed someone to come out and try to handle this. So I’m going to only be here six months. That’s maximum,” said Moore.

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