Iraqi immigrant living in Indy watches his country closely

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — An Iraqi refugee in Indianapolis is watching developments in his homeland closely. Ali Haddad still has relatives living in Baghdad, the city where he grew up.

Ali Haddad, works for Indianapolis based Exodus Refugee Immigration, the group that found Haddad and his wife and two children a place to live when they were forced to leave Iraq two years ago.

Haddad says what’s happening in Iraq right now is no surprise.

“Many people predicted what is going on right now. Because it was obvious the Iraqi’s security forces are not accountable to do the job,” he says.

For Haddad Indy is a long way from growing up in Saddam Husein’s Iraq.

“People were afraid to talk about Saddam in front of their kids,” says, for fear the kids might repeat it and the family could end up dead.

“I was a quality assurance, quality control engineer,”

In 2003, Haddad got a job as a civil engineer working for the U.S. army. By 2012, he was forced to flee his country. He was afraid for his and his family’s safety.

“They didn’t come here for a better life. They came here for a life. And so I think they’re torn always,” says Carleen Miller Executive Director of Exodus Refugee Immigration, the local group that helped Haddad and hundreds of other refugees from around the world settle here.

“How can they rebuild their country when their talent has to leave, because it’s not safe to lilve there,” she says.

Ali says three things are needed to help Iraq stand on its own. A new prime minister, getting religion out of the government and negotiation. Boots on the ground he says could help make all that happen.

“In Iraq, we want America to interfere. Because we don’t trust Iran. We don’t trust the Saudi’s. And we don’t trust our own people, because they are not accountable,” he says.

Haddad says it’s not likely he’ll be able to go back to Iraq for 20 years or more.

He says it’s likely to take that long for the nation to change.  He also added the problem is that all the different groups there are out for revenge against one another.
Until that ends, peace without military involvement is unlikely.

 

 

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