Finding a former meth house just got a little easier

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – The Serrano family moved to United States from Cuba in June of 2013. In the March, the Cuban refugees purchased a home in the 500 block of Eastern Avenue. The family loves their home and they have plans on turning it into a church.

“I want to raise the children here,” said Pastor Cesar Serrano.

Over the past couple of months Serrano has replaced the kitchen, painted the walls and tossed out cabinets. He did all of this before learning that in 2013, Indiana State Police labeled his home as a former meth house.

According to Indiana State Police meth lab houses can be safe if they are cleaned up properly.

“I’ve never seen the drug before,” said Serrano.

Recently the State of Indiana created a webpage on meth houses in the state. On the site users can find the addresses of homes labeled as meth house. Visitors can also find out the year the home was labeled, what county the home is in and what items were taken from the house.

Currently meth residue testing is not part of a home inspection.

Often times meth houses leave behind residue from dangerous chemicals like mercury, red phosphorus, and lead. Home buyers can have their home tested for meth thru a private company or purchase a swab test for about $20. A meth contamination test can be part of the home inspection process if the buyer request one.

Detecting a meth house is difficult once all the chemicals and evidence has been removed from the home. Often times there are no outward signs of contamination. Investigators list gasses that don’t stain surfaces as one way the chemicals are left behind or even embedded in the home.

Because of those findings ISP is encouraging home buyers to log on to determine if the home has been used as a meth lab.

The recent findings have not deterred the Serrano family. In fact they are currently turning the former meth house they purchased into God’s house. The family plans to open a church there on July 22.

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