Knightstown cross returned to town Christmas tree

(Photo Courtesy: Curt Hunt)

KNIGHTSTOWN, Ind. (WISH) — A cross is back on the Knightstown Christmas tree, about two weeks after a man sued to get it removed.

Using a lift truck, a man returned the cross to the tree Thursday. A motion to request a preliminary injunction was lifted to allow the cross back on the tree as long as it was not placed on top, ACLU-Indiana legal director Ken Falk told 24-Hour News 8. Falk added that the case is not over, as he will look to see if the cross being on the tree but not on top is unconstitutional.

Many residents were outraged when the religious symbol was removed Dec. 12.

It all started after one resident in town filed a lawsuit claiming his civil liberties were being infringed upon. That suit was then picked up by the ACLU. Residents said they understood the man’s complaint, but say their fight isn’t over.

“Keep Christ in Christmas no matter where you’re at,” said Lora Lewman, who attended a pro-cross rally at the town square.

“The cross is not a Christmas symbol,” Falk said. “The cross is the preeminent symbol of Christianity and it reminds Christians not of the secular trappings of Christmas, but of the crucifixion and the resurrection of Jesus.”

“The fact that it is up there shows us that we still have the right to profess our faith openly and it doesn’t have to be at the top of the tree,” said Curt Hunt, a local pastor.

Hunt says the lawsuit has brought the town together. He says many people are donating other large ornaments that do not have religious meaning for the tree. On Thursday a snowflake and bell were added as well.

“The cross is not a Christmas symbol,” Falk said. “The cross is the preeminent symbol of Christianity and it reminds Christians not of the secular trappings of Christmas, but of the crucifixion and the resurrection of Jesus.”

A star is now at the top of the tree.

 

(Photo Courtesy: Curt Hunt)
(Photo Courtesy: Curt Hunt)
(Photo Courtesy: Curt Hunt)
A cross is back on the Knightstown Christmas tree, but it’s not on the top. (Photo Courtesy: Curt Hunt)