Father reflects upon sons’ murders

(WISH Photo)

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – Clarence Havvard Sr. sat on the porch of his Butler-Tarkington home. During a candid conversation, Havvard opened up about losing three of his sons to murder. His eyes couldn’t conceal the pain he’s endured over the years.

In 2003, Havvard’s son, Clarence Havvard Jr., died after a gunman shot him at a gas station at Emerson Avenue and English Avenue.

Detectives did not discover a motive, and Havvard believes it was a case of mistaken identity. Clarence Jr., who spent his spare time in church, would sell CDs and DVDs to make ends meet.

Time moved on. In less than 10 months later, Havvard would bury his oldest son. Police responded to a call for help and found Charles Havvard in an alley clinging to life. Someone had shot Charles multiple times, he would succumb to his gunshot wounds.

Clarence and Charles cases remain unsolved.

On August 26, 2015, tragedy would strike for a third time. Clarence “Wade” Havvard III., a 32-year-old city worker decided to go back to his Butler-Tarkington neighborhood for a visit. Only he would not make it out of his old neighborhood. A gunman shot and killed the father of two in a drive-bye shooting.

“Whoever did this is a coward, those who know, who know who did it won’t say anything and they are supposed to be his friends,” said Havvard.

Around the time of Clarence III’s murder, there were a series of shootings and killings in the Butler-Tarkington area. The murderous stretch even included the deadly shooting of 10-year-old De’Shaun Swanson.

Swanson attended a prayer vigil, someone fired shots in the crowd, striking and killing the little boy. Since those cases IMPD hoped to generate leads and tips to stir detectives in the right direction.

Then in April of 2016, Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry, IMPD leaders and the FBI announced charges against the Gett Money Gang.

Court documents linked the 15 suspects to a slew of assaults, robberies and murders in the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood.

The charges gave Havvard a since of hope; however, that would soon evaporate.

“They had some guys locked up, it was a gang.  All of sudden they let them go on bond or whatever,” said Havvard.

With no new updates from police on the horizon, Havvard chooses to live each day in prayer.

“I pray a lot, I have a lot of faith in God, my wife is the same way, we pray a lot together. I think God will open the doors for us one day,” said Havvard.

Currently, Havvard shoulders the pain with not only his wife, but with his four adult children.

Never miss another Facebook post from WISH-TV