Indy Rezone helps launch modernized city code

(WISH Photo/Eric Halvorson, file)

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Indianapolis celebrated the brand new zoning code.

According to the release, the ordinance replaces the 47-year-old version and represents the urbanized growth in Indianapolis.

The update was a part of Indy Rezone, a initiative of the Department of Metropolitan Development. Indy Rezone is a five-year planning and public engagement process.

“The new ordinance allows our zoning code to catch up to our shared vision for the future of our community,” Mayor Joe Hogsett said. “Indianapolis is a collection of vibrant, distinctive neighborhoods that will no longer be limited by an outdated code. The revisions include details designed to enhance quality of life for the entirety of our city.”

The goal was to use zoning to combat city issues. The ordinance introduces a Vacant Building provision that allows certain addition uses in specific districts if the building has been vacant for more than five years, the release said.

“There are areas of our city that are in need of reinvestment,” DMD Director Emily Mack explained. “Indy Rezone aims to tackle the challenges we face by thinking holistically about community development and supporting and valuing existing communities and neighborhoods while providing more transportation options, promoting equitable, affordable housing, and enhancing Indy’s economic competitiveness.”

Departments have been working together to make the transition a smooth one.

“The staff at DCE has worked diligently to prepare for the new zoning changes under Indy Rezone,” DCE Director Jason Larrison said. “Thanks to extensive training with our partners at DMD, our staff will be better able to communicate zoning ordinance revisions and how they impact our residents’ needs.”

There are a couple changes that will directly affect the public’s lives. They are: updates to Indianapolis’ plans for walkability/bikability, stream cooridors, flooding, trees and landscaping, personal livestock and gardens, safety, renewable energy and redevelopment opportunities.

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