Young, Bayh fighting for Senate seat to the bitter end

The three candidates for Indiana's open U.S. Senate seat, from left, Libertarian Lucy Brenton, Democrat Evan Bayh and Republican Todd Young participate in debate in Indianapolis, Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016. The Indiana campaign has become a key national race as Democrats try to capture the seat now held by retiring Republican Sen. Dan Coats and overturn the GOP's narrow Senate majority. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, Pool)
The three candidates for Indiana's open U.S. Senate seat, from left, Libertarian Lucy Brenton, Democrat Evan Bayh and Republican Todd Young participate in debate in Indianapolis, Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016. The Indiana campaign has become a key national race as Democrats try to capture the seat now held by retiring Republican Sen. Dan Coats and overturn the GOP's narrow Senate majority. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, Pool)

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – In addition to President of the United States and governor of Indiana, Hoosiers will select a new U.S. Senator.

Hoping to replace the retiring Dan Coats are Democrat Evan Bayh, Republican Todd Young and Libertarian Lucy Brenton.

Bayh, a former Indiana governor and U.S. Senator, jumped into the race after being picked by Indiana Democratic Party leaders to replace Baron Hill.

The race to fill the seat being vacated by Republican Dan Coat has turned contentious at times.  Democrats have accused Young, the former 9th District congressman, of seeking to eliminate Medicare and failing to support the 2008 auto bailout that went to car manufacturers Chrysler and General Motors.

On the other hand, Republicans have accused Bayh of being “a sellout”, attacking his support of the Wall Street bailout and Obamacare.  The question of Bayh’s Indiana residency as well what he did after leaving the Senate have become a focus of the campaign.  Using connections while serving in the U.S. Senate, Bayh went on to make millions.

Young has also been forced to answer for a report that shows he failed to report contributions properly when he ran for Congress in 2010.

Young paid $30,000 in fines and penalties following that campaign.

The recent WISH-TV/Ball State Hoosier Survey showed Bayh leading the Republican Young 49-43.

Hoosiers will make their voices heard in the race for U.S. Senate as they go to the polls Nov. 8.