Website a ‘go-to resource’ on Indiana opioid crisis

Next Level Recovery is a new Indiana website with resources to deal with the state's opioid crisis. (WISH Screenshot)

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — For the first time the state of Indiana has a single website to help in the fight against opioid addiction.

The state said it’s a one-stop shop for people looking to learn more about or help prevent opioid abuse.

The opioid crisis has taken the nation by storm, from heroin to powerful painkillers. They can be addictive and can easily lead to lives spiraling out of control.

Go to Indiana’s Next Level Recovery website and you’re hit with eye-opening statistics about the opioid crisis.

Gov. Eric Holcomb calls the site a “go-to resource” for anyone looking for help or information about opioid addiction. Tabs include new Indiana laws on opioids, state statistics, treatment options and prevention options.

“We focus less on treatment referral so it will be perfect for us,” said Justin Phillips, who runs the nonprofit Overdose Lifeline, which aims to prevent opioid deaths and reduce the stigma around opioid addiction.

Phillips’ son Aaron died of a heroin overdose in 2013. She said the site can help prevent more deaths.

“The state is intending to create this one-stop place where you can get the answers, referrals, questions that you are looking for,” she said.

But she said the site can be better. One of the biggest challenges in Indiana’s opioid crisis is that there aren’t enough treatment facilities and people simply don’t know where to turn.

“Update bed availability, have that really broken-down information on insurance and what insurance is taken there, is it self-pay, what is the average costs?”

“Those kind of simple broken-down things families don’t know and really need to know,” she said.

Holcomb promised to tackle five pillars to improve Indiana, one being the opioid crisis.

A few months ago the governor announced a revamped computer system to make it easier for pharmacists and doctors to prevent overprescribing opioid prescription drugs.